Tansy and Tennessee

Tansy

>According to liquor historian A. J. Baime, in the 19th century Tennessee whiskey magnate Jack Daniel enjoyed drinking his own whiskey with sugar and crushed tansy leaf.

Tansy was used as a face wash and was reported to lighten and purify the skin.[6][7] In the 19th century, Irish folklore suggested that bathing in a solution of tansy and salts would cure joint pain.[14] …tansy is still a component of some medicines and is listed by the United States Pharmacopeia as a treatment for fevers, feverish colds, and jaundice.[4][7][12][medical citation needed]   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tansy

Ran across a pamphlet, Cajun Herbal Healers pdf, from a tourist village in La Louisianne.

Interesting info… in English French and Creole, Tansy = Tennessee according to their spelling. But the correct French Tanaisie would be pronounced ~ the same.

From Fr wiki:
Cette plante est citée dans le capitulaire De Villis datant du début du ixe siècle, parmi les plantes potagères et aromatiques recommandées. Une recette du Liber cure cocorum en utilise les feuilles hachées pour aromatiser l’omelette10.
Séchée, cette plante est utilisée par certains apiculteurs comme combustible pour l’enfumoir11. Elle aurait l’avantage d’avoir un effet calmant sur les abeilles et l’odeur de la fumée produite serait sans incidence sur le goût du miel (contrairement à l’usage du carton par exemple).
C’est aussi une plante ornementale, notamment la variété crispum à feuilles frisées et très découpées.
Répulsif contre les tiques. On peut se frotter les poignets, la nuque, les chevilles avec une feuille, les tiques et moustiques détestent cette odeur12

> Small amt used as culinary herb px omelette, rub the leaves on the skin and mosquito and tick repellent that is good for the skin.

Wormwood, Artemisia absinthium, is a different plant, it is not Tansy. However, both are maligned for alleged toxic effects of the constituent thujone. “The dose makes the poison.” For absinthe the drink historically banned in some countries, the liver damage was probably more due to chronic alcoholism and also copper sulfate also sometimes added to the concoction for the intense green color.

Feverfew, Tanacetum parthenium, Costmary, T balsemita, are in the same genus as common Tansy, T vulgare.

Medicinal and culinary herbs that contain thujones include, but are not limited to: sage, mugwort, oregano, tansy, wormwood, and some species of mint. Source: http://www.healwithfood.org/side-effects/sage-tea-thujone-toxic-dose.php#ixzz4sQTzqq3g

Back to the initial subject, download the pamphlet here:
http://www.vermilionville.org/vermilionville/explore/Healer’s%20Garden%20Brochure%20Web.pdf

 

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