“If Lyme Disease Is There Japanese Knotweed Will Follow”

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Not surprising because they both spread in similar environment and climate conditions… you might not wish for either but there are collateral benefits from their coincidence.

fallopia-japonica-northshore-crop
Is it a dreadful alien invader, a terrorist among plants? The Hammer of Truth, Nature’s payback to an arrogant species (humans) for their own violence and invasions of Nature?

A Language of Plants:

Japanese Knotweed, formally known as Fallopia Japonica or Polygonum cuspidatum (cuspid/spade shaped leaves.) This plant (the specimen at the library) is the dwarf/landscape gardening variety compacta, not so aggressive and invasive as big brother; both are growing in Grand Marais, Minnesota!

In Japan it is called Itadori, the rough translation suggests its uses: relieve or remove pain.

The plant was introduced to North America more than 100 years ago and possibly more than 150. Like many black-listed invasive species, it thrives primarily in disturbed and contaminated  environments. The hollow jointed stalks resemble bamboo and the edible shoots have historically  been sold in markets as American Bamboo Shoots. The root is one source of Resveratrol, an antioxidant “longevity” supplement discovered originally in wine and grapes. See sample label below:

Supplement Facts

Serving Size 1 Softgel
Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Resveratrol (from Polygonum cuspidatum Extract (root) 100 mg **

 

“Follow the money!”

With many Invasive Plant Species that have been around and naturalized in their new host countries for a long time, some observers wonder what all the fuss is about and whether the manufacturers of pesticides and other chemicals have conveniently exaggerated and exploited the issues to increase sales. (In the past many of those same opportunist companies started business with ammunition and explosives then expanded into nerve gas, fertilizer, pesticides, and finally other Ag chemicals and GMO/bio-engineering.)

I was going to compile a balance sheet on Japanese Knotweed, the case for the prosecution and the case for the defense. But it is too much a reflection of the current intolerant and hostile presidential campaign rhetoric.

Marcus Aurelius wrote 1800 years ago, “What Nature inflicts Nature can cure.”

Lyme disease appears to be expanding, invading new territory. A herbalist TCM practitioner has said, “If Lyme has reached your region Japanese Knotweed will not be far behind.”

Re: the meaning of the name Itadori, relieve pain, Isak Dinesen took up the same subject, writing that there are three forms of perfect happiness in life.
1. To feel within yourself an excess of strength
2. To know you are fulfilling your destiny
3. The remission of pain

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Wild and Wacky Plants

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http://nwtarts.com/sites/default/files/wild_and_wacky_plants_of_the_nwt.pdf

With drawings and information about medicinal and edible plants of the NWT, many common in areas farther south, written for a children’s audience. Strange that this free download book has seen no promotion and no other review or description online…

ww-plantain

Common Plantain
Plantago major
Common plantain grows as a weed near many settled areas in
the North. The leaves have five to seven obvious ribs. The stems
are 30 cm long with a dense narrow spike of tiny, yellowish
white flowers. Look around your doorway or yard; there’s a
good chance plantain is growing there.
Seeds from this plant have
lain dormant for as long as 40
years and then sprouted
between the cracks of a
sidewalk
Another name for plantain is “white
man’s foot” because everywhere
settlers walked, the plant
sprung up.
Rulus Numeris Uno
Remember Rule #1
Plantain Salad
1. Pick young plantain leaves
early in spring.
2. Mix with other salad greens or
wild greens like dandelion.
3. Add tomatoes and cucumber.
4. Toss with vinegar and oil.

Introduction ……………………………………………………………. 1

Wildflowers
Butterwort …………………………………………………………… 2
Cloudberry ………………………………………………………….. 4
Common Plantain …………………………………………………. 6
Common Yarrow ………………………………………………….. 8
Fireweed ……………………………………………………………. 10
Indian Paintbrush ……………………………………………….. 12
Mountain Avens …………………………………………………. 14
Prickly Saxifrage…………………………………………………. 16
Red Baneberry ……………………………………………………. 18
Silverweed …………………………………………………………. 20
Twinflower ………………………………………………………… 22
Wild Mint ………………………………………………………….. 24
Yellow Lady’s Slipper ………………………………………….. 26

Aquatic Plants
Cat-tail ……………………………………………………………… 28
Duckweed …………………………………………………………..30
Rat Root ……………………………………………………………. 32
Water-arum ………………………………………………………. 34
Yellow Pond-lily …………………………………………………. 36
Horsetails
Common Horsetail ……………………………………………… 38

Sedges
Cotton-grass ……………………………………………………… 40
Shrubs
Black Currant …………………………………………………….. 42
Bog Rosemary ……………………………………………………. 44
Crowberry …………………………………………………………. 46
Ground Juniper…………………………………………………… 48
Labrador Tea ……………………………………………………….50
Mountain Cranberry and Kinnikinnick ……………………. 52
Prickly Wild Rose ……………………………………………….. 54
Silverberry…………………………………………………………. 56
Soapberry …………………………………………………………. 58
Willow ……………………………………………………………… 60

Trees
Black Spruce and White Spruce …………………………….. 62
Jack Pine …………………………………………………………… 64
Paper Birch and Dwarf Birch ………………………………… 66
Tamarack ………………………………………………………….. 68
Trembling Aspen and Balsam Poplar ………………………. 70

Reference List ………………………………………………………… 72
Index ……………………………………………………………………. 74

http://northernbushcraft.com/guide.php?ctgy=edible_plants&region=nt

http://northernbushcraft.com/

Plantago/plantain leaf is more valuable for many purposes than the seed husk.

This investigation shows that the P. major and C.
tetragonoloba contained important biologically active
compounds and P. major leaves had the highest total
phenol, flavonoid and tannin content. In addition, ethanol,
cold and hot extracts of the same plants showed
antioxidant activity, but the highest antioxidant activity
was found in ethanolic extract of P. major leaves .Also,
ethanolic extract of P. major leaves had the greatest
effect on tumor cell growth followed by hot water extract
of P. major leaves.   http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1380545577_Mohamed%20et%20al.pdf

A Song of Plants: Poke Sallet Annie

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Polk salad Annie / ‘Gators got your granny / Everybody said it was a shame / For the mama was working on the chain-gang…

Sally, sallet, salad, sale’ ??

Elvis or Johnny Cash version?

Halfway, Elvis pulls a piece of paper out from under his belt, looks at it, hands it off. Forgot the lyrics?

Vs. Johnny Cash more into it. JC: “Sadie Fox says there was 14 kinds of weeds good to eat”

TJW: “What’s one of em?”

JC: “Poke salad”

A Language of Plants

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Poetry, Plants and Nature, expressions of The Word and of Art, are the antidote to the dull and dreary tyranny of prose, grammar, dictionaries, conformity, and compartmentalized conventional education…

OPHELIA
There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray,
love, remember: and there is pansies, that’s for thoughts.
LAERTES
A document in madness, thoughts and remembrance fitted.
OPHELIA
There’s fennel for you, and columbines: there’s rue
for you; and here’s some for me: we may call it
herb-grace o’ Sundays: O you must wear your rue with
a difference. There’s a daisy: I would give you
some violets, but they withered all when my father
died: they say he made a good end,–
Sings
For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy.

An Interview with Michael Longley, onbeing.org:

Poetry is useless and yet invaluable

I have said that where poems come from, I have no idea. And if I have a plan, if I think, “I’d love to write a poem about that,” and I do a bit of homework on the subject, it doesn’t work at all. I’ve got to be taken by surprise.

Somebody was complaining within earshot of being under-recognized, and John turned to me, and he says, “If you write poetry, it’s your own fault.”

Religious poetry: religion, from Latin religare, to bind fast or connect.

“If prose is a river, poetry is a fountain.” In other words, poetry uses language in a way that’s free-flowing, and at the same time, shapely. And I do like the word “shape.”

“I get down on my knees and do what must be done, and kiss Achilles hand, the killer of my son.“

yarrow-flowers

(Achillea/Yarrow-Heroic, Confident but Modest-what Achilles the plant’s namesake lacked until Priam humbled him)

Stanley Kunitz, and he was 100 when I went to see him, beautiful old man. And he wrote in the preface to his collected poems, which I’d recommend to anyone, that form was a way of conserving energy. Isn’t that wonderful? He said the energy soon leaks out of an ill-made work of art.

I think what poetry does is it uses words at their most precise and their most suggestive. And one word out of place, and the poem’s dead. It’s shocking, but that’s true.

… I’ve loved it for years and years — is English critic, Cyril Connolly, and he compared the arts to a little gland in the body, like the pituitary gland, which is at the base of the spine. And it seems very small and unimportant, but when it’s removed, the body dies

Accept compliments but don’t inhale

The Ice-Cream Man

Rum and raisin, vanilla, butterscotch, walnut, peach:
You would rhyme off the flavours. That was before
They murdered the ice-cream man on the Lisburn Road
And you bought carnations to lay outside his shop.
I named for you all the wild flowers of the Burren
I had seen in one day: thyme, valerian, loosestrife,
Meadowsweet, tway blade, crowfoot, ling, angelica,
Herb robert, marjoram, cow parsley, sundew, vetch,
Mountain avens, wood sage, ragged robin, stitchwort,
Yarrow, lady’s bedstraw, bindweed, bog pimpernel.

“Who was it who suggested that the opposite of war / Is not so much peace as civilisation? / He knew / Our assassinated Catholic greengrocer who died / At Christmas in the arms of our Methodist minister, / And our ice-cream man whose continuing requiem / Is the twenty-one flavors children have by heart. / Our cobbler mends shoes for everybody; our butcher / Blends into his best sausages leeks, garlic, honey; / Our corner shop sells everything from bread to kindling. / Who can bring peace to people who are not civilized? / All of these people, alive or dead, are civilized.”

HISTORY OF THE CRIES OF LONDON

Let none despise the merry, merry cries

Here’s fine rosemary, sage and thyme
Come, buy my ground-ivy
Here’s featherfew, gilliflowers and rue

Come, buy my knotted marjorum, ho !
Come, buy my mint, my fine green mint
Here’s fine lavender for your cloaths
Here’s parsley, and winter-savory
And heartsease, which all do choose
Here’s balm and hyssop and cinquefoil
All fine herbs, it is well known
Let none despise the merry, merry cries
Of famous London Town

Here’s penny royal and marygolds
Come, buy my nettle-tops
Here’s water-cresses and scurvy-grass
Come, buy my sage, of virtue, ho !
Come, buy my wormwood and mugwort
Here’s all fine herbs of every sort
Here’s southernwood that’s very good
Dandelion and houseleek
Here’s dragon’s tongue and wood sorrel
With bear’s-foot and horehound
Let none despise the merry, merry cries
Of famous London Town

https://www.daniellesplace.com/html/bible-crafts-beatitudes.html

Dandelion – “Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness . . . ” Matt. 5:8

Although dandelions have both medicinal and food value they are despised by homeowners and gardeners. They are poisoned, ripped from the earth, and cursed yet they continue to flourish.